Brand Product Imagery: How To Guarantee Loyalty Through This Solution

You may think that product images are just on your e-commerce website to sell products. Well, they can perform another task – Brand Building.

It is undeniable that brand building plays an important role in customers returning to a particular website over and over again. If created properly, images can deepen a potential customers attachment to a brand.

Continue Reading to learn more about how to best craft your very own brand images through your existing product photos.

Source: www.abercrombie.co.uk

In the above example, fashion retailer Abercrombie & Fitch use young, athletic models to display their products. They also consistently use the same dark white background for all their product images.

How are brand product images different to regular product images?

The majority of e-commerce sites give little to no thought on building a brand through their product images. Brand product images are basically how you build your website aesthetic, while still making your product images attractive to potential buyers.

Brand images can appear in a variety of different forms. For example traditional, simple, modern, complex, edgy etc. What these brand product images do is present a motion to the potential customer (Brand Feelings).

This type of connection is hard to quantify. Confidence and trust are built up over a period of time. Through repeat exposure.

Brand product imagery allows you to show potential customers exactly who you are and also why they should trust you or your product.

Brand product images give you a significant advantage over competitors who are simply looking to sell without building a brand.

How do you create great brand product images?

Firstly you need to do a little bit of research. Identify your perfect customer. Visualise the customer and exactly what they want. Through this, you can find visualise what your visitors will respond to.

In the above example of 2 car manufacturers, both are selling basically the same products, but both are trying to sell to two completely different target audiences.

In the above example of 2 car manufacturers, both are selling basically the same products (cars), but both are trying to sell to two completely different target audiences.

Both images of the cars have been heavily edited, the backgrounds are especially almost cartoon-like.

In the Ford ad, the image is set on an open Road in the desert. The bright red car, bold fonts. It signifies speed and freedom. To sell the idea that the cars are Powerful, strong and fast.

The Mercedes ad, on the other hand, uses a silver coloured car, in a city environment and using clean professional looking fonts. The colours and styling exude confidence, luxury and technology. This is to attract the aspirational customer.

These examples are fairly extreme. We have chosen them to illustrate how a brand can be affected by a product image.

A brand product image can be heavily affected by the product itself, colour, composition, text, style and in particular consistency.

In order to portray the correct image feel knowing the basics of colour and typography theory are very useful.


Source: www.businessinsider.com.au

In the image above you can see how famous brands use color to represent their entire brand and display emotion.
If you know your audience well then it is fairly straightforward to pick the right design elements to focus on.
As soon as you figure out what works, stick to it. Consistency across your images is key.

Need Some Help?

If you need help in developing your own brand for your products we can help. Each and every business we work has an allocated point of contact.
If you have any questions about this or any aspect of image presentation or optimisation then we are available to help.

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Written by Paul Lloyd, CEO of Pixel By Hand.
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